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Documentaries, society

Capital in the Twenty-First Century

YEAR: 2019 | LENGTH: 1 part (103 minutes)  |  SOURCE: IMDB

description:

Adapting one of the most groundbreaking and powerful books of our time, Capital in the 21st Century is an eye-opening journey through wealth and power, that breaks the popular assumption that the accumulation of capital runs hand in hand with social progress, shining a new light on the world around us and its growing inequalities. Traveling through time from the French Revolution and other huge global shifts, to world wars and through to the rise of new technologies today, the film assembles accessible pop-culture references coupled with interviews of some of the world’s most influential experts delivering an insightful and empowering journey through the past and into our future.
Documentaries, technology

In the Age of AI

YEAR: 2019 | LENGTH: 1 part (115 minutes)  |  SOURCE: PBS

description:

FRONTLINE investigates the promise and perils of artificial intelligence, from fears about work and privacy to rivalry between the U.S. and China. The documentary traces a new industrial revolution that will reshape and disrupt our lives, our jobs and our world, and allow the emergence of the surveillance society.

Documentaries, society

Chris Packham: 7.7 Billion People and Counting

YEAR: 2020 | LENGTH: 1 part (59 minutes)  |  SOURCE: BBC

description:

According to the UN, it is predicted that the human population could reach ten billion people by the year 2050. For broadcaster and naturalist Chris Packham, who has dedicated his life to championing the natural world, the subject of our growing population and the impact it is having on our planet is one of the most vital – and often overlooked – topics of discussion in an era of increasing environmental awareness. Chris is worried that a world of ten billion may simply be too many people for the earth to sustain, given the impact 7.7 billion humans are already having. Travelling around the globe in search of answers to difficult and sometimes controversial questions, Chris investigates why our population is growing so rapidly, what impact it is having on the natural world, and whether there is anything that can be done. Chris travels to Brazil to discover a megacity on the verge of running out of water and an industry expanding to feed our growing numbers – with dire consequences for biodiversity. In Nigeria, a country set to become the third most populous nation on earth by 2050, overtaking the United States, Chris visits an extraordinary community surviving against the odds and a school that might hold the answer to a future fall in the birth rate. Back home in Britain, Chris interviews Sir David Attenborough – like Chris, he is a patron of the charity Population Matters. Chris also examines the role of falling birth rates around the world, the impact of an aging population, and meets a couple who are struggling to get pregnant through IVF. With interviews from several population experts, Chris’s focus ultimately turns to the impact our levels of consumption are already having, and asks whether the world can rebalance to accommodate the needs of over two billion more people.
Documentaries, society

10 Dollar Death Trip

YEAR: 2020 | LENGTH: 1 part (42 minutes)  |  SOURCE: DW

description:

The world is fighting a deadly pandemic, but over in North America another heartbreaking public health crisis is still raging. A synthetic drug is killing more people than gun crime, homicide and car accidents combined. One hundred times stronger than heroin, the opioid fentanyl is cheap, potent and can be sent through the post. These market forces have seen it replacing heroin and causing unprecedented death, destruction and misery. The death toll has disproportionately affected the homeless and already marginalized. Now, due to its strength and low cost, the drug is also starting to be mixed into party drugs, such as cocaine and cannabis – with fatal results. The documentary travels to Vancouver, the epicenter of the fentanyl epidemic to meet with health care workers, activists, fentanyl dealers and addicts. It shows some of the radical initiatives fighting the abuse of this drug, and asks what the world could face if the fentanyl epidemic spreads outside of North America.
Documentaries, society

The Elephant In The Living Room

YEAR: 2010 | LENGTH: 1 part (96 minutes)  |  SOURCE: WIKIPEDIA

description:

The Elephant in the Living Room is an American documentary film about the topic of exotic pets kept in homes in the United States and about the controversy surrounding this topic. In some U.S. states there are currently no laws that prohibit keeping exotic animals as pets, and this documentary presents incidents in which their owners and people around them are put in serious danger and hurt by these animals.
Documentaries, society, technology

Amazon: What They Know about Us

YEAR: 2020 | LENGTH: 1 part (44 minutes)  |  SOURCE: 4CORNERS

description:

“They have amassed so much knowledge about us. What we know is a pittance compared to what they can know about us.” Harvard professor Amazon is a corporate colossus that dominates the global retail landscape. As a company, it has changed the way commerce operates to emerge as a corporate superpower. “Domination was on Jeff’s mind from the beginning.” Former senior Amazon manager In a quarter of a century the company has transformed itself from three staff in a garage to nearly 800,000 employees worldwide. It’s propelled its founder, Jeff Bezos from a small-scale book seller to a tech titan. He’s now the richest man in the world.
Documentaries, medicine, society

Sicko

YEAR: 2007 | LENGTH: 1 part (123 minutes)  |  SOURCE: WIKIPEDIA

description:

Sicko is a 2007 American political documentary film by filmmaker Michael Moore. Investigating health care in the United States, it focuses on the country’s health insurance and the pharmaceutical industry. The film compares the profiteering, non-universal U.S. system with the non-profit universal health care systems of Canada, the United Kingdom, France and Cuba.

Documentaries, society

The Social Media Beauty Cult

YEAR: 2020 | LENGTH: 1 part (42 minutes)  |  SOURCE: DW

description:

Social media are influencing the way women feel about their own bodies. Young women in particular are constantly being confronted with pictures of beautiful female bodies online – images which have almost always been digitally enhanced. This documentary take a long and alarming look at young women whose everyday lives are dictated by the search for bodily perfection.

The more users click their way through Instagram, Facebook and so on, the greater their dissatisfaction with their own appearance becomes. Hardly anyone can escape the pull of this illusory world, where beauty, fitness and lifestyle count for everything. The consequences an even be fatal: slimming and fitness crazes, eating disorders of all kinds, body shaming and sexism. During her research, filmmaker Jennifer Rezny came across a Canadian study that found that young women’s insecurity has been increased by social media. It feels like almost everyone is trying to present themselves on Instagram in slick filter-processed selfies these days. Despite increasing calls for diversity, the “ideal” female body still dominates the media’s perception of female beauty. Numerous movements and initiatives – even on the part of the fashion and advertising industries themselves – have had little effect. “The female body has always been a carrier of female identity. It’s nothing new for us women to be objectified and sexualised,” says Rezny. “There has also been a great deal of social development, but we are still not where we should be and where we women want to be, in an equal society. And in any case, we live in a meritocratic society, one defined and colored by capitalism, which always has to be optimized and improved. It can never be enough.”

Documentaries, nature

My Octopus Teacher

YEAR: 2020 | LENGTH: 1 part (86 minutes)  |  SOURCE: WIKIPEDIA

description:

The film shows how, in 2010, Foster began free-diving in a cold underwater kelp forest at a remote location in False Bay, near Cape Town, South Africa. The location was near Simon’s Town on the Cape Peninsula,[3] which is exposed to the cold Benguela current of the Atlantic Ocean. He started to film his experiences and, in time, a curious young octopus captured his attention. By visiting her den and tracking her movements every day for months, he won the animal’s trust. In the film, Foster describes the impact on his life of his relationship with the octopus. The film shows the octopus defending herself against pyjama sharks. In one attack, the octopus loses an arm, and then retreats to her den to recover, regenerating the arm. Later, after mating with another octopus and producing a large number of eggs, the octopus dies and the film shows a shark taking her body away. Foster then describes the effect of his experience with the octopus on his relationship with his son, and his son’s development as a diver and student of marine life.
Documentaries, society

Searching For Sugar Man

YEAR: 2012 | LENGTH: 1 part (85 minutes)  |  SOURCE: WIKIPEDIA

description:

Searching for Sugar Man is a 2012 Swedish–British–Finnish documentary film about a South African cultural phenomenon, directed and written by Malik Bendjelloul, which details the efforts in the late 1990s of two Cape Town fans, Stephen “Sugar” Segerman and Craig Bartholomew Strydom, to find out whether the rumoured death of American musician Sixto Rodriguez was true and, if not, to discover what had become of him. Rodriguez’s music, which had never achieved success in the United States, had become very popular in South Africa although little was known about him in that country.